Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘collections’

Creating pathfinders has put my blogging on hold for the last week, but I’m nearing the end of my internship path, and I will be field testing my pathfinders tomorrow during my advisor Doc Martens’s site visit.

As it turned out, 30 pathfinders was a lofty project goal for the time allotted.  As of today, I have managed to complete 15 pathfinders, but Mr. Escobar and Buddy, head of the Hardesty Children’s Dept., seem very happy with these results nonetheless.  Mr. Escobar introduced me to a number of excellent resources to help with selecting library materials for marketing.  NoveList is a powerful online resource, providing bibliographic information for books as well as summaries, reviews, lexile range, awards won, etc.  I also used print resources, including Valerie and Walter’s Best Books for Children, Books Kids Will Sit Still For, The Children’s Literature Lover’s Book of Lists, and The NY Times’ Parent’s Guide to the Best Books for Children.  The Something About the Author series is another valuable resource for collection building and marketing, although I did not get a chance to consult it with regards to my pathfinder project.

The pathfinders I created are as follows:

Books for Little Buccaneers
Shiver Me Timbers
Princesses
Fractured Fairy Tales
Hamsters
Books About Summer
Back to School
Life After Harry Potter
Christmas (Easy Picture Books and Beginning Readers)
Christmas (grades 1 – 3 and grades 4 – 6)
Hanukkah
Kwanzaa
Trees & Animal Tracks
If you like American Girls…
Pura Belpré Award

The Fractured Fairy Tales, Books About Summer, Back to School, and Christmas (Easy Picture Books and Beginning Readers) pathfinders are tailored for parents, while the other pathfinders are tailored for children.  Parent pathfinders contain more and smaller text, while children’s pathfinders contain less text, larger text, more space in between text, and multiple graphics.  Librarians can distinguish between pathfinders for parents and those for children by looking for a small letter P (for Parent) at the bottom of the bookmark.  The variety of pathfinder categories that I chose allowed me to provide access to informational, educational and recreational resources within the TCCL children’s collections.

Comparing TCCL catalog holdings with lists of highly acclaimed books provided by NoveList and the print resources mentioned above allowed me to identify some gaps within the TCCL children’s collections.  For instance, TCCL might only have one copy of a certain award-winning book, or a very limited number of beginning readers on the subject of Hanukkah.  Ideally, library collections should contain materials reflecting all the varied views and experiences of its customers.  Continuous efforts must be made through careful weeding and collection development practices to adhere to this standard.

Tomorrow I will field test my pathfinders by distributing them to children and parents and then collecting feedback.  I will position myself near the Storytime Room and the Teen Teamers dispensing summer reading stickers and prizes, and I will ask parents and children if they would like any of my pathfinders on various topics.  When the parents and children go to the desk to check out their library materials, the staff at the desk will ask them if the pathfinders they received were helpful.  These staff will have a spreadsheet where they can simply check Yes or No, check whether the customer was an adult or child, and list the name of the pathfinder(s) the customer took/used.  This field test will provide quantitative data about the usefulness of my pathfinders.

Qualitative data could be gathered if pathfinders were modified to include the URL for a surveymonkey survey, which parents could complete if they so choose.  It might be difficult to get customers to participate in the survey though.  Perhaps if participants could be given some kind of gift certificate, for a free ice cream or something, in return for completing a survey, we could collect more survey data.

Ideally, the pathfinders I have created would be made available in both paper and digital format.  The children’s TCCL website has pages to help customers find certain kinds of books under Books and Reading, such as award-winning books, mysteries, scary stories, etc.  Ideally, this section of the website would be modified to include the reading lists I have compiled, and should include the capability to print these lists in bookmark form.  Providing pathfinders both in paper format and digital format will make these resources more widely accessible for customers whether they are physically present in the library or searching library collections remotely through the TCCL online catalog.  Individual titles in the digital pathfinders should be hyperlinked so that customers can click on the title to check availability of the item, as is currently available under each list here.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

One of my goals for my internship at Hardesty Library is to develop a project that demonstrates many of the principles and skills I’ve learned through my LIS classes and my internship.  I want a showcase piece that I can include as the keystone of my portfolio.

Mr. Escobar asked me to develop plans for three possible projects: a Plan A, a Plan B and a Plan C.  The object lesson of this exercise is to understand that your first plan doesn’t always work out the way you expected: sometimes you get partway through a project or study and realize it’s not actually feasible.  Sometimes you can’t get administrative support or funding for your Plan A.  This is why you should always have a backup plan or two up your sleeve.

I asked Buddy, the head of the Hardesty Children’s Department, what the children’s department needed—what would he like to investigate if he had time, or what projects he had on the backburner.  He said the children’s department really needs more pathfinders for books on holidays and frequently-asked-for subjects like pirates, princesses and hamsters.  (Apparently the book The World According to Humphrey has made hamsters all the rage!)  I thought developing pathfinders sounded like fun, so I started brainstorming.

Here are the project plans I developed:

Plan A: Children’s Pathfinders

Goal:  Assist children and parents to locate books of interest on popular and frequently requested subjects, including educational, informational and recreational resources.

Objectives:

  1. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking popular genres of library materials, including scary stories, mysteries, adventure stories, animal stories, funny stories, fantasy stories, historical fiction and sports stories.
  2. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking books similar to popular series, such as the Junie B. Jones and American Girls series.
  3. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking award-winning children’s books beyond the well-known Newberry and Sequoyah award-winners.
  4. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking popular subjects, including pirates, princesses, hamsters, holidays, and tree and animal track identification resources.
  5. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking specific formats of library materials, such as manga and books with movie tie-ins.
  6. Make pathfinder information available in both print and online format to expand access to librarians and customers.

Activities:

  1. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for the 14 categories listed on the children’s website under Books and Reading/ Find a Good Book/ If You Like… (http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/books/like.htm).
  2. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for award-winning children’s books, including those awarded the Zarrow Award for Young Readers’ Literature and the Pura Belpré Award.
  3. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for subjects frequently assigned for school research, including tree identification and animal tracks identification resources.
  4. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for popular subjects and formats frequently requested by children, including pirates, princesses, hamsters, juvenile manga, and books with movie tie-ins
  5. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for holiday books and media, including Valentine’s Day, President’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hanukkah and Ramadan.
  6. Include URLs to quality websites for additional resources where applicable.
  7. Create template for website layout of these pathfinders, with links to printable pathfinders.
  8. Distribute sample pathfinders and collect customer feedback via brief interviews.

Budget:

Design of Pathfinders
            2 Staff Hours @ $15/hour X 29 Pathfinders = $870
Paper
            3 Reams @ $4 per ream = $12
Printing
            $0.03 per Sheet X 1,500 Sheets = $45
TOTAL: $972

 

Plan B: Survey of Children 

Goal:  Increase awareness and usage of Books and Reading resources on children’s TCCL website (http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/books/).

Objectives:

  1. Survey children to assess knowledge of Books and Reading resources on the children’s TCCL website and assess children’s comfort using these resources.
  2. Use survey findings to inform possible redesign of this portion on the website.
  3. Use survey findings to inform marketing tactics for Books and Reading resources.

Activities:

  1. Design anonymous, child-friendly surveys with simple words and no more than five questions.  Include at least one open-ended question, where children can suggest ways to make the Books and Reading resources easier to use.
  2. Create parental consent forms.
  3. Request approval of surveys through IRB.
  4. After receiving parental consent, administer surveys to children between ages 7 and 11.  Read questions aloud if requested.  Assure participants that there are no wrong answers.
  5. Analyze results.

Budget:

Creation of Surveys and Consent Forms
            4 Staff Hours @ $15/hour = $60
Paper
            6 Reams @ $4 per ream = $24
Printing
            $0.03 per Sheet X 3,000 Sheets = $90
Analysis of Survey Results
            10 Staff Hours @ $15/hour = $150
TOTAL: $324

  

Plan C : Children’s Book Talk

Goal:  Increase children’s and parents’ awareness of various genres of children’s literature and tools for locating items of interest.

Objectives:

  1. Cultivate children’s and parents’ interest in various genres of children’s literature
  2. Teach children and parents where to find and how to use tools for locating library materials in these and other categories.

Activities:

  1. Provide snacks, themed to tie in with books where possible.
  2. Create displays of three books for several genres, such as horror, adventure, mystery and humor.
  3. Introduce each genre, noting appeal factors.
  4. Introduce each displayed book briefly (approx. 2 minutes) with descriptions designed to hook the audience.
  5. Introduce paper pathfinders for each genre.
  6. Show location of these and other pathfinders on children’s TCCL website by projecting website on a screen or wall and demonstrating navigation to Books and Reading resources.
  7. Invite questions from children and parents.
  8. Try to limit program to 30 minutes or less, not including Q&A.

Budget:

Planning for Book Talk
            9 Staff Hours @ $15/hour = $135
Paper
            50 Sheets @ $0.01 per sheet = $0.50
Printing
            $0.03 per Sheet X 50 Sheets = $1.50
Snacks = $15
TOTAL: $152

Read Full Post »

This post continues the discussion from my previous posting, explaining the various changes instituted by TCCL and Hardesty in policy, procedure and facility design since my early days of library circulation work (1998-2003).

TCCL now provides a number of important and valuable resources for staff on its Intranet.  The Intranet provides access to the TCCL policy manual, staff contact information, an online timesheet for clocking hours worked, and information related to health insurance, dental insurance and insurance coverage for various prescriptions.  Templates for printing CD labels and labels for boxes of magazine back issues are available on the Intranet.  Librarians can access listservs to discuss issues with other TCCL staff, such as children’s services or outreach issues.  Also, the Intranet provides forms frequently required by staff, such as vacation request forms, accident forms, incident forms, donation forms, forms for customers who want to request that TCCL purchase a book not currently in the system, and forms for customers who want to request that TCCL remove a book from the system.  Gone are the days when library staff had to rummage through the backroom filing cabinets for these forms.  Now staff can easily access and print these documents from any staff terminal.  I’m sure TCCL had an Intranet in my early circ days, but I don’t remember anyone showing me how to use it.  In the old days, we only had paper time sheets to log our work hours and paper vacation requests.  I remember reading many pages of library policies, but I only had a paper copy, which wasn’t always easily accessible if you needed to refresh your memory on a specific point of policy.  The new Intranet makes a wealth of information and documents easily accessible to all library staff.

TCCL’s children’s website has been expanded significantly in the last six years.  It allows children to search the catalog by text or by picture, and it provides a number of helpful resources like pathfinders, reliable websites for homework research, games, children’s attractions in the Tulsa area and local libraries, and resources for parents and teachers.  There are some navigational features missing that would enhance usability if added, such as links to allow users to navigate from a submenu to a main menu.  The word on the street is that TCCL is preparing to redesign the children’s website soon, so I am sure a number of improvements will be made in the process.

During my internship hours spent in the children’s department, I have not seen any children using the children’s catalog.  I’ve seen them playing games on the computers, and I’ve seen parents using the general catalog at the two kiosks in the children’s department.  Mostly I’ve seen parents and children asking the librarians when they need help finding something.  I asked Buddy, the head of the Hardesty Children’s Department, if they had ever offered a class to show children how to use the children’s catalog.  He said they had tried to offer classes before, but attendance numbers were very low.  At one such class, parents dropped their children off, and the kids didn’t seem to absorb the information very well.  Buddy says they are going to try to offer another class where parents and children can sit at the computer and learn together.  The children’s librarians are anticipating better results with this set-up.

The library has also created a new Tween fiction collection for children and parents who want longer, more advanced books without the adult content that appears more often in young adult and adult fiction collections.  As more and more parents have asked librarians for help in locating challenging reading material without sexual content for their children, the Tween collection was developed to meet this need.  The TCCL catalog reflects the location of these books in the Tween section, just as it reflects the location of books in the Juvenile fiction section.  Tween books are identified by a T sticker on their spines, just as juvenile fiction has  J stickers on their spines.  This collection is located just inside the children’s department, right next to the door, since tweenage customers are almost ready to graduate from the children’s department and to move on to the young adult department.

Another change in the Hardesty children’s department involves the arrangement of the story time room.  When the story time room was originally designed, there was an erupting volcano in the midst of a jungle scene painted on the north wall, and steps carpeted in orange and yellow, looking like lava flowing down a hill, for children to sit on during story time.  A short stairway outside the story time room led up to a child-sized door that opened up at the top of the carpeted stairs inside the story time room.  This arrangement was very visually appealing, and the children enjoyed climbing up the steps and having a special place to sit.  However, the story time room did not have continuous adult supervision when story time was not in session.  The steps inside the story time room were feared to be unsafe for children to climb on without adult supervision, so they were removed, and the child-sized door was sealed.  The jungle painting was expanded to cover where the steps had been, and the room looks very nice despite the changes.  But this situation demonstrates the importance of carefully planning and thinking through facility designs when refurbishing or building new library facilities.  It’s very difficult to foresee all the possible flaws in a plan still in blueprint form, but it costs a lot of money to have to go back and change things later.

IMG_0349.1

TCCL is working hard to polish and update the image of the library, to dust off the collections and make things look shiny and new.  In support of this effort, Mr. Escobar and his staff have been weeding heavily.  When checking in library materials, staff are encouraged to set aside items that look ragged—books with broken spines, ripped pages or covers, water damage, pages falling out, broken media cases, etc.  Covers and media cases can be easily replaced, but if the item itself is damaged and ratty, it is placed in a tote in the workroom so that a librarian can assess it for withdrawal.  Like new library materials and magazines, withdrawals are processed daily.  Since the catalog shows books in the withdrawal box as being available for check out until they are withdrawn from the system, processing withdrawals daily reduces the amount of time staff must spend looking for items that are not on the shelf because they have been set aside for withdrawal.  Hardesty’s shelves are no longer crammed with old ratty books that never circulate.  This makes it easier for shelvers to do their jobs and for customers to browse without feeling overwhelmed.

A number of libraries have book sale areas, where books and other media that have been donated or withdrawn from the library catalog can be sold for a dollar or less.  Hardesty’s book sale used to be located just inside the front doors, next to where the coffee shop used to be.  However, in the interest of maintaining the library’s new and shiny image, Hardesty’s book sale has been moved upstairs to the southwest corner of the library.  This shift means that the first library materials that customers see upon entering the library are the new items, rather than the old, faded, sometimes ragged donated and withdrawn books of the book sale.  True, book sales have decreased, but the money collected is all profit.  Because volunteers organize the book sale, the library incurs no cost by providing it.  Moving the collection to a more discrete location supports the library’s clean and revitalized image.  And as customers find the book sale’s new location, hopefully sales will increase again.

Computer usage policies and maintenance procedures have also changed a bit in the last few years.  During my early circulation days, TCCL had to institute time limits for customer computer usage in order to ensure that a few customers didn’t monopolize the computers while others were denied access.  I was there when librarians tried instituting sign-up lists for the computers, but that didn’t work so well.  Some customers signed up but didn’t show up on time while others beged and pleaded for more time.  Now every customer with a library account can use the computer for 60 minutes per day at branch libraries, and for 90 minutes per day at regional libraries like Hardesty.  Before 2 pm and after 5 pm, customers can request to have their computer time extended if they need it.  The librarians can remotely add time to a customer’s account, without leaving their station at the desk.  This is very beneficial when the staff have a long line of customers to serve.  At the end of the day, the computers are automatically and remotely shut down by the Central Library IT Dept. 10 minutes after closing time.  In the old days, the librarians had to walk around shutting off each computer in the library, and occasionally had to try to extract customers who didn’t want to relinquish a computer.  Now librarians can simply tell these customers that if they don’t save their work and log out, their work may be lost as the computers are remotely shut down.  This setup saves a great deal of time at the end of the day.

I was surprised to learn that the magnetic security strips in library materials are being phased out, and that all library materials are already receiving RFID tags.  I hadn’t really thought about how the magnetic security system and the RFID system would work together, and I didn’t expect TCCL to already be RFID compatible.  I thought that shift would still be a few years down the road, for some reason.  I remember back in 1998 or 1999 when the libraries shut down for a week in order to apply the magnetic security strips to the collections.  It was a time-consuming process, and we only had enough resources to tag every third book or so.  Although the staff terminals still scan items for check-in and check-out via barcode readers, the self-check machines are able to scan the RFID tags in library materials.  According to Mr. Escobar, the magnetic security gates had no discernable effect in reducing the number of stolen library items.  I wonder if one day there will be no need to check out books to customers by hand—perhaps scanners will read the RFID tags on library items as customers walk out the door?

As you can see, Tulsa area libraries have come a long way in just a few short years.

Read Full Post »

While the sky grew dark and poured out torrents of rain, I waded into an information storm of policies, procedures and best practices this morning.  Today was the first day of my summer internship at the Hardesty Regional Library.  I had forgotten how much there is to learn when first entering into a new professional arena; the policies, procedures, best practices, cultural aspects—it’s a lot to absorb.  All told, I completed seven hours toward my internship today.

Mr. Louix Escobar very generously dedicated most of his day to my orientation, reviewing policies and best practices, explaining administrative structure, and providing a tour of the library collections and facilities.  By relating personal experiences, Mr. Escobar illustrated a number of very useful lessons in best practices for personnel supervision and collection organization. 

Mr. Escobar explained Hardesty’s new practice of rotating staff between the circulation desk, children’s desk and reference desk.  This system helps all staff members to understand the responsibilities and challenges of each work station and enables staff to fill in for each other when someone is absent due to vacation or sickness.  This practice also helps to eliminate the perception that some staff teams are more important or more powerful than others.  I can imagine that if staff did not rotate among all three departments, some staff members might feel that working in certain departments was beneath them.  I think this rotation practice is an excellent means of fostering a unified sense of purpose and a team spirit among all staff members. 

Additionally, each department is equipped to provide circulation and reference services, which reduces the need to bounce customers from department to department.  It is not transparent to customers as to why only certain staff can check out books or accept overdue fines, so now all Hardesty departments can perform these functions.  The circulation desk can answer some reference questions as well, but certain reference questions that require lengthy research and/or special expertise must still be referred to reference staff.  This arrangement makes customer service much more efficient and effective.

Several changes have been made in the arrangement of furniture and collections since the new Hardesty building first opened, and Mr. Escobar’s explanation of the reasons for these changes was very enlightening.  Origninally the entrance hall was filled with armchairs, but now only a bench is provided in front of the new books shelf.  Apparently when the comfy chairs were present, families were likely to linger and talk in this area, and because of the tile floor and vaulted ceiling, this made the entryway very noisy and crowded.  By replacing the comfy chairs with a less-comfy bench, customers are less likely to linger in the entryway, and instead move on to the comfortable seating in carpeted areas, which are quieter.

IMG_0345.1

When Hardesty first opened at its new location, it included space for a coffee shop.  However, the coffee shop has closed and the space has been remodeled into a study room for customers and a catering kitchen for groups utilizing library meeting rooms. 

where the coffee shop used to be

where the coffee shop used to be

The coffee shop represented part of an effort to create an atmosphere more like large bookstore, like Barnes & Noble or Borders.  Mr. Escobar said he does not believe the bookstore model works for libraries.  He asked what I thought about the trend to make libraries like bookstores, why the recent push for this design.  I didn’t have a ready answer, although I said I had certainly read about this trend.  I haven’t read enough to know if a bookstore design has worked particularly well for any particular libraries.  Now that I’ve had time think about it, I’m certain that the reason behind this trend is an effort to make libraries trendy.  Library professionals believe that the public views libraries as outdated, fusty, dusty, restrictive and unaccommodating.  We are trying to reinvent the library’s image and reassert our relevance in today’s society.  Some have thought that trying to imitate the trendy bookstores with trendy little coffee shops was the way to do this.  However, we’ve seen recently, even before the economy tanked, that bookstores are struggling.  Borders could be on the border of bankruptcy.  Mr. Escobar argues that it never works to pretend to be something you are not.  This makes sense.  Libraries need to update their image based on the relevant and useful services they provide.  It’s important not to lose focus on the library’s mission and purpose. 

I would like to know more details as to why the coffee shop didn’t work, though.  Not enough business?  Too many spills?  Too many noisy bean-grinding and frappe-blending machines?  I’ll see what else I can find out.

I will continue my first day of library lessons in the next post.

Read Full Post »