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Posts Tagged ‘pathfinders’

My supervising faculty member, Dr. Martens, and the internship documents provided sufficient explanation of what was required by the OU School of Library and Information Studies in terms of documentation and hours of service.  My placement supervisor, Louix Escobar-Matute, provided ample orientation by giving me a tour of the library facilities and collections, explaining the organization and work flow of each department, and encouraging me to review the Tulsa City-County Library’s policies and procedures.  My placement supervisor also directed me to spend several hours shadowing and working in each department to learn standard operating procedures.  All in all, my orientation to the internship experience was more than adequate.

I worked in the circulation department, checking in and routing returned library materials to the proper locations.  I processed holds on requested items and cleared the hold shelf of expired requests that customers did not pick up.  I learned how to use the Millennium circulation software, including how to check library materials in and out, place hold requests for customers, process fines for late materials, and create new library card records for new customers.  In addition, I assisted circulation staff with tracking down missing pieces of library materials, such as DVD cases returned without the DVD.  I also observed the process of creating on-the-fly records for periodicals.  Although I worked as a shelver and circulation clerk for the Tulsa City-County Library from June 1998 to May 2003, a number of policies and procedures have changed since then, and it was very helpful to revisit circulation procedures and learn the reasons for changes implemented.  Experience working in the circulation department provided insight as to the need for careful planning and understanding the repercussions of work practices.  This was not reflected in my initially stated objectives but was nonetheless a valuable lesson.

I also served in the reference department, where I assisted customers with reference questions, helped customers with computer issues and did paging.  This assignment allowed me to practice skills such as the reference interview and customer service.  Also, this experience allowed me to see the other half of the holds process, in which requested items are collected, labeled and routed to the desired location.  Assisting with adult information services and assisting with holds were two of my initial objectives, both of which were fulfilled through this experience.  While I did not have the opportunity to assist with adult programming, I did have the opportunity to provide directions to rooms where programs and meetings were being held.

Serving in the children’s department allowed me to practice the reference interview with children and to learn the procedures related to summer reading program activities.  I observed three children’s events in Connor’s Cove, Hardesty Library’s new auditorium, and assisted by taking pictures during one of these events.  Assisting with children’s information services, children’s programming and the summer reading program represent three of my initial objectives.  Working in this department also allowed me to observe and learn from the information seeking behavior of children and parents, which can provide a wealth of information in itself.

My internship project involved researching and designing pathfinders on popular educational, informational and recreational subjects for children and parents.  Buddy Ingalls, head of the Hardesty Children’s Department, indicated that the department really needed pathfinders on a number of frequently requested subjects to assist customers and librarians quickly locate relevant materials.  This project allowed me to learn about collection development and marketing.

All of the activities outlined above were exceedingly valuable with regards to fulfilling my learning objectives. 

The class on Readers’ Advisory Services (LIS 5123) was helpful with regards to my pathfinders project, as this class taught me how to create useful pathfinders.  Management of Information and Knowledge Organizations (LIS 5023) was also helpful in understanding the various management challenges Louix discussed.  Information Users in the Knowledge Society (LIS 5053) was helpful as I considered accessibility issues with regards to collections and services.  All in all, I felt very well prepared by my courses thus far.

The most positive aspects of this internship included having the opportunity to work with and learn from professionals in the field and the opportunity to interact with customers.  Louix and his staff have so much experience and expertise to impart.  The training I received under their supervision was truly invaluable.  Moreover, the practical, real-world experience of working with customers, tackling real reference questions and negotiating real challenges provides excellent training in applying theory.  Because I have as yet had no training in how to properly conduct a reference interview, this task was challenging.  But observing experts in the field as they answered reference questions provided me with guidance, and personal trial and error allowed me to learn by doing.  This internship enabled me to begin to fill the gaps in my experience.

Louix Escobar-Matute provided numerous opportunities for my enrichment.  He permitted me to work in all three library departments, encouraged me to attend library-sponsored programs, and invited me to attend a Friends of the Library meeting and a staff development planning meeting.  He permitted me to fill in when there were staff shortages, allowing me to gain additional experience.  He took me to lunch multiple times with various staff members, allowing me to benefit from accounts of their career experiences.  Louix also made the necessary phone calls and arrangements so that I can work as a substitute for the Tulsa City-County Library, filling in when other staff members are sick or on vacation.  I could not ask for a better mentor than Louix in the public library field.

Communication between Louix Escobar-Matute, Dr. Martens and me was easy and effective.  I kept Dr. Martens abreast of my activities through my blog as well as periodic emails.  Louix spent several hours each day talking with me about policies, procedures, best practices, and expectations.  He provided a great deal of very helpful feedback after I completed each assignment and encouraged my questions.  At the end of my internship, Dr. Martens and Louix were in contact via email regarding my performance.  I believe our communication was very effective throughout this internship period.

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Field testing and the site visit went well yesterday, I think.  First I met with Louix Escobar and Doc Martens, and I showed Doc Martens my pathfinders and explained my process for resource selection and field testing.  Despite my getting a little nervous and tongue tied, I think this was fairly well received.

Next I went to the children’s department to distribute my pathfinders while Doc Martens observed.  I had given a data collection sheet to Buddy, head of the Children’s Dept., earlier that morning to show and explain to the children’s staff.  I made sure each person working the children’s desk had a data collection sheet and understood how to record the data.  A few days earlier I had explained my field testing and data collection process to all the children’s staff, although I didn’t have the data collection sheet with me at that time.  Louix was looking out for me and made sure to “check for understanding,” ensuring the staff understood the process.

I had planned to simply sit back with Teen Teamer near the Storytime Room, expecting a steady stream of children and parents to be flowing that direction as they so often do.  However, I ended up starting my field testing in the lull between storytimes, so while there were a number of parents and children browsing in the children’s dept., they weren’t exactly flowing my direction.  Therefore, I decided I should modify my plan and try walking around and offering my pathfinders to customers, rather than being stationary.  Doc Martens observed as I roamed around and asked customers if they would be interested in my bookmarks with lists of good books about, pirates, princesses, hamsters, etc.

The vast majority of children present were under age 8, perhaps partly because the storytimes offered Wednesday morning were tailored for younger children.  As I distributed my pathfinders, I addressed parents and children, but I primarily addressed the parent when the children were clearly too young to understand what I was offering.  Had more than one or two children older than 6 been present, I would have addressed these children more directly.  It’s important to direct attention to the children, to make children feel that their input is valued.  When addressing parents, librarians should endeavor to make children feel included in the conversation as much as possible.

Only one parent said she wasn’t interested in my pathfinders.  All the others took between one and four of my pathfinders.  Most of the adults present were women, mothers or grandmothers, although there were two fathers present.  Two women who were either Hispanic or Latina did not speak much English, and while I gave them several pathfinders, I’m not sure they understood what they were.

Because of the number of pathfinders I created (15), it was difficult to market all of them equally as I engaged with customers.  I assumed customers would get impatient if I listed all 15 of my available pathfinders.  I assumed that customers would not be particularly interested in pathfinders for winter holidays in the middle of July, although I did try to offer the Christmas, Kwanzaa and Hanukkah pathfinders to a few people.  I took some cues from the gender of the children with the parent.  I carried a handful of the pathfinders around and asked parents and children if they would be interested in a book mark with lists of good books about pirates, princesses, hamsters, summer, back to school, books to read after Harry Potter, etc.  I mentioned princess and pirate pathfinders when addressing girls and parents with little girls, but I mostly did not mention princesses when addressing boys and parents with little boys.  I held out an array of pathfinders to parents and children regardless of gender, including pirates and princesses, so they could pick out any they wanted, but I did not want to potentially offend little boys by offering them a list a books about princesses.  This might have been the wrong thing to do.  Ideally, all pathfinders should be made equally available to all customers without any kind of judgement or expectations about their selections with regards to the customer’s gender or other characteristics.  In any case, I’m afraid all my pathfinders did not get equal emphasis during distribution.

In addition to approaching customers, I also spread out my pathfinders on a small table next to the Teen Teamer’s station, so that customers passing by could pick them up if they wished.  As I walked around offering my pathfinders to customers, the ones most requested were for pirates and princesses, followed by hamsters and American Girls, then Harry Potter, and lastly one or two requests for books about summer.  I do not believe any of the holiday, back to school or tree/animal track identification pathfinders were taken, unless customers picked them up from the table while I was elsewhere.

One child requested a pathfinder featuring books about dogs.  Although I did not have a pathfinder on this topic, I directed her to a pathfinder with books about animals, including dogs, on a stand near the door.  I did not see her go pick one up however.  Because she was quite young (probably younger than 8), I think now that I should have picked up the animal books pathfinder and physically handed it to her.  That would have been a more effective way of meeting her information need.  In any case, the fact that children want books about dogs is valuable information.  This would be another valuable topic for a pathfinder.

In the 45 minutes or so dedicated to field testing, we did not collect much feedback from customers.  Only three adults responded to the question “did you find the booklist bookmark helpful?”  Two adults said no and one said yes.  There was no feedback from children (most likely because they were too young to understand and respond).  I believe that the period of time between receiving the pathfinder and checking out was insufficient for customers to assess the usefulness of my pathfinders.  Ideally, these pathfinders should be tested over a period of several weeks or months, to give customers ample time to use these tools.  I told Louix this, and he said this was exactly the conclusion that he hoped I would reach.  Nonetheless, he said this field testing was valuable as a learning exercise for future field research later in my education and career.

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Creating pathfinders has put my blogging on hold for the last week, but I’m nearing the end of my internship path, and I will be field testing my pathfinders tomorrow during my advisor Doc Martens’s site visit.

As it turned out, 30 pathfinders was a lofty project goal for the time allotted.  As of today, I have managed to complete 15 pathfinders, but Mr. Escobar and Buddy, head of the Hardesty Children’s Dept., seem very happy with these results nonetheless.  Mr. Escobar introduced me to a number of excellent resources to help with selecting library materials for marketing.  NoveList is a powerful online resource, providing bibliographic information for books as well as summaries, reviews, lexile range, awards won, etc.  I also used print resources, including Valerie and Walter’s Best Books for Children, Books Kids Will Sit Still For, The Children’s Literature Lover’s Book of Lists, and The NY Times’ Parent’s Guide to the Best Books for Children.  The Something About the Author series is another valuable resource for collection building and marketing, although I did not get a chance to consult it with regards to my pathfinder project.

The pathfinders I created are as follows:

Books for Little Buccaneers
Shiver Me Timbers
Princesses
Fractured Fairy Tales
Hamsters
Books About Summer
Back to School
Life After Harry Potter
Christmas (Easy Picture Books and Beginning Readers)
Christmas (grades 1 – 3 and grades 4 – 6)
Hanukkah
Kwanzaa
Trees & Animal Tracks
If you like American Girls…
Pura Belpré Award

The Fractured Fairy Tales, Books About Summer, Back to School, and Christmas (Easy Picture Books and Beginning Readers) pathfinders are tailored for parents, while the other pathfinders are tailored for children.  Parent pathfinders contain more and smaller text, while children’s pathfinders contain less text, larger text, more space in between text, and multiple graphics.  Librarians can distinguish between pathfinders for parents and those for children by looking for a small letter P (for Parent) at the bottom of the bookmark.  The variety of pathfinder categories that I chose allowed me to provide access to informational, educational and recreational resources within the TCCL children’s collections.

Comparing TCCL catalog holdings with lists of highly acclaimed books provided by NoveList and the print resources mentioned above allowed me to identify some gaps within the TCCL children’s collections.  For instance, TCCL might only have one copy of a certain award-winning book, or a very limited number of beginning readers on the subject of Hanukkah.  Ideally, library collections should contain materials reflecting all the varied views and experiences of its customers.  Continuous efforts must be made through careful weeding and collection development practices to adhere to this standard.

Tomorrow I will field test my pathfinders by distributing them to children and parents and then collecting feedback.  I will position myself near the Storytime Room and the Teen Teamers dispensing summer reading stickers and prizes, and I will ask parents and children if they would like any of my pathfinders on various topics.  When the parents and children go to the desk to check out their library materials, the staff at the desk will ask them if the pathfinders they received were helpful.  These staff will have a spreadsheet where they can simply check Yes or No, check whether the customer was an adult or child, and list the name of the pathfinder(s) the customer took/used.  This field test will provide quantitative data about the usefulness of my pathfinders.

Qualitative data could be gathered if pathfinders were modified to include the URL for a surveymonkey survey, which parents could complete if they so choose.  It might be difficult to get customers to participate in the survey though.  Perhaps if participants could be given some kind of gift certificate, for a free ice cream or something, in return for completing a survey, we could collect more survey data.

Ideally, the pathfinders I have created would be made available in both paper and digital format.  The children’s TCCL website has pages to help customers find certain kinds of books under Books and Reading, such as award-winning books, mysteries, scary stories, etc.  Ideally, this section of the website would be modified to include the reading lists I have compiled, and should include the capability to print these lists in bookmark form.  Providing pathfinders both in paper format and digital format will make these resources more widely accessible for customers whether they are physically present in the library or searching library collections remotely through the TCCL online catalog.  Individual titles in the digital pathfinders should be hyperlinked so that customers can click on the title to check availability of the item, as is currently available under each list here.

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One of my goals for my internship at Hardesty Library is to develop a project that demonstrates many of the principles and skills I’ve learned through my LIS classes and my internship.  I want a showcase piece that I can include as the keystone of my portfolio.

Mr. Escobar asked me to develop plans for three possible projects: a Plan A, a Plan B and a Plan C.  The object lesson of this exercise is to understand that your first plan doesn’t always work out the way you expected: sometimes you get partway through a project or study and realize it’s not actually feasible.  Sometimes you can’t get administrative support or funding for your Plan A.  This is why you should always have a backup plan or two up your sleeve.

I asked Buddy, the head of the Hardesty Children’s Department, what the children’s department needed—what would he like to investigate if he had time, or what projects he had on the backburner.  He said the children’s department really needs more pathfinders for books on holidays and frequently-asked-for subjects like pirates, princesses and hamsters.  (Apparently the book The World According to Humphrey has made hamsters all the rage!)  I thought developing pathfinders sounded like fun, so I started brainstorming.

Here are the project plans I developed:

Plan A: Children’s Pathfinders

Goal:  Assist children and parents to locate books of interest on popular and frequently requested subjects, including educational, informational and recreational resources.

Objectives:

  1. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking popular genres of library materials, including scary stories, mysteries, adventure stories, animal stories, funny stories, fantasy stories, historical fiction and sports stories.
  2. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking books similar to popular series, such as the Junie B. Jones and American Girls series.
  3. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking award-winning children’s books beyond the well-known Newberry and Sequoyah award-winners.
  4. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking popular subjects, including pirates, princesses, hamsters, holidays, and tree and animal track identification resources.
  5. Provide ready-made lists of library resources for parents and children seeking specific formats of library materials, such as manga and books with movie tie-ins.
  6. Make pathfinder information available in both print and online format to expand access to librarians and customers.

Activities:

  1. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for the 14 categories listed on the children’s website under Books and Reading/ Find a Good Book/ If You Like… (http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/books/like.htm).
  2. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for award-winning children’s books, including those awarded the Zarrow Award for Young Readers’ Literature and the Pura Belpré Award.
  3. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for subjects frequently assigned for school research, including tree identification and animal tracks identification resources.
  4. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for popular subjects and formats frequently requested by children, including pirates, princesses, hamsters, juvenile manga, and books with movie tie-ins
  5. Create paper pathfinder bookmarks for holiday books and media, including Valentine’s Day, President’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hanukkah and Ramadan.
  6. Include URLs to quality websites for additional resources where applicable.
  7. Create template for website layout of these pathfinders, with links to printable pathfinders.
  8. Distribute sample pathfinders and collect customer feedback via brief interviews.

Budget:

Design of Pathfinders
            2 Staff Hours @ $15/hour X 29 Pathfinders = $870
Paper
            3 Reams @ $4 per ream = $12
Printing
            $0.03 per Sheet X 1,500 Sheets = $45
TOTAL: $972

 

Plan B: Survey of Children 

Goal:  Increase awareness and usage of Books and Reading resources on children’s TCCL website (http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/books/).

Objectives:

  1. Survey children to assess knowledge of Books and Reading resources on the children’s TCCL website and assess children’s comfort using these resources.
  2. Use survey findings to inform possible redesign of this portion on the website.
  3. Use survey findings to inform marketing tactics for Books and Reading resources.

Activities:

  1. Design anonymous, child-friendly surveys with simple words and no more than five questions.  Include at least one open-ended question, where children can suggest ways to make the Books and Reading resources easier to use.
  2. Create parental consent forms.
  3. Request approval of surveys through IRB.
  4. After receiving parental consent, administer surveys to children between ages 7 and 11.  Read questions aloud if requested.  Assure participants that there are no wrong answers.
  5. Analyze results.

Budget:

Creation of Surveys and Consent Forms
            4 Staff Hours @ $15/hour = $60
Paper
            6 Reams @ $4 per ream = $24
Printing
            $0.03 per Sheet X 3,000 Sheets = $90
Analysis of Survey Results
            10 Staff Hours @ $15/hour = $150
TOTAL: $324

  

Plan C : Children’s Book Talk

Goal:  Increase children’s and parents’ awareness of various genres of children’s literature and tools for locating items of interest.

Objectives:

  1. Cultivate children’s and parents’ interest in various genres of children’s literature
  2. Teach children and parents where to find and how to use tools for locating library materials in these and other categories.

Activities:

  1. Provide snacks, themed to tie in with books where possible.
  2. Create displays of three books for several genres, such as horror, adventure, mystery and humor.
  3. Introduce each genre, noting appeal factors.
  4. Introduce each displayed book briefly (approx. 2 minutes) with descriptions designed to hook the audience.
  5. Introduce paper pathfinders for each genre.
  6. Show location of these and other pathfinders on children’s TCCL website by projecting website on a screen or wall and demonstrating navigation to Books and Reading resources.
  7. Invite questions from children and parents.
  8. Try to limit program to 30 minutes or less, not including Q&A.

Budget:

Planning for Book Talk
            9 Staff Hours @ $15/hour = $135
Paper
            50 Sheets @ $0.01 per sheet = $0.50
Printing
            $0.03 per Sheet X 50 Sheets = $1.50
Snacks = $15
TOTAL: $152

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